Archive for November, 2010

How to Install LED lights in a Kitchen

November 29, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/nycwnPGWiJg?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

 

Our kitchens are where we spend a lot of our time.  This means that this room, in particular, will spend more time with the lights on than some of the other rooms in our homes.  The video above will detail how to install LED lights in a Kitchen.

I found this video helpful, though, a little on the lo-fi side.  I still think you’ll see the benefit as well as the simplicity of retro-fitting your home for LED lighting.  As an added bit of advice, I would suggest stringing the project out to stretch your dollar.  Do this by converting to LED light bulbs as the old standard bulbs or CFLs burn out to avoid the cost of all your LEDs on the front end.  Replace them one at a time.

Are you in the middle of an LED project?  Let us hear about it.  Post your adventures or misadventures in the comments below.

How to Install LED lights in a Kitchen

November 29, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/nycwnPGWiJg?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

 

Our kitchens are where we spend a lot of our time.  This means that this room, in particular, will spend more time with the lights on than some of the other rooms in our homes.  The video above will detail how to install LED lights in a Kitchen.

I found this video helpful, though, a little on the lo-fi side.  I still think you’ll see the benefit as well as the simplicity of retro-fitting your home for LED lighting.  As an added bit of advice, I would suggest stringing the project out to stretch your dollar.  Do this by converting to LED light bulbs as the old standard bulbs or CFLs burn out to avoid the cost of all your LEDs on the front end.  Replace them one at a time.

Are you in the middle of an LED project?  Let us hear about it.  Post your adventures or misadventures in the comments below.

Christmas Light Advice

November 23, 2010

Before you start stringing those lights, take a moment to consider what they're costing you. They may have been fairly inexpensive to purchase, but operating them can cost more than you think—especially if you have a lot of them, and especially if you are using the larger "C-7" bulbs. [via ecnmag]

Christmas light advice should always be dispensed in teaspoon measure.  A potluck helping can quickly sour.  Everyone, it seems, has a better method or a better time saving tip to take the edge off the, sometimes, burdensome task of hanging the Christmas lights.  Advice is often begrudgingly accepted or shrugged off as pride steps in.  Here is a teaspoon worth of advice that was sent to me.  Enjoy.

Install Automotive LED Lights

November 19, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/wNeUowenE_Y?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

 

This post is less to do about changing out a tail light on a Jeep and more about the ease of installation. The LED industry has made it easy to convert from standard lighting to LED lighting.

 

Automotive LED lights are no exception. As you can see in the video, it took just minutes. What makes this possible is the forethought that was put into developing clever mechanisms that allow the automotive LED lights to work with the existing hardware.  Similar solutions are also available for home lighting situations.  See below.

 

http://www.youtube.com/v/sGeD5V-Ny_U?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

 

Pretty easy, right?  Automobiles are a little different in that they require a little more skill but there are tons of tutorials on the web.  I’m particularlly fond of Youtube.

 

http://www.youtube.com/v/HGQpC1qk-d0?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

You have other options, but a video tutorial is the best for the visual learner, in my opinion. If you feel you can’t make the conversion to LED because you aren’t good with your hands then take it to the web. There are just too many options for people to be sitting on our hands. Check out the web for handy advice before you start your next project.

Install Automotive LED Lights

November 19, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/wNeUowenE_Y?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00 This post is less to do about changing out a tail light on a Jeep and more about the ease of installation. The LED industry has made it easy to convert from standard lighting to LED lighting.

Automotive LED lights are no exception. As you can see in the video, it took just minutes. What makes this possible is the forethought that was put into developing clever mechanisms that allow the automotive LED lights to work with the existing hardware.  Similar solutions are also available for home lighting situations.  See below.

 

 

Pretty easy, right?  Automobiles are a little different in that they require a little more skill but there are tons of tutorials on the web.  I’m particularlly fond of Youtube.

 

http://www.youtube.com/v/HGQpC1qk-d0?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

You have other options, but a video tutorial is the best for the visual learner, in my opinion. If you feel you can’t make the conversion to LED because you aren’t good with your hands then take it to the web. There are just too many options for people to be sitting on our hands. Check out the web for handy advice before you start your next project.

Solar Power From Our Highways

November 11, 2010

Today from CleanTechnica:

Thousands of miles of highways stretched across the U.S., and every day they soak up heat from the sun, sometimes to the tune of 140 degrees and more. Harnessing the solar energy in highways would go a long way toward helping to replace oil and other fossil fuels with a far safer and more secure source of power, and now researchers at the University of Rhode Island have come up with four potential avenues of approach.
Read the full article at CleanTechnica.

A Green Christmas

November 10, 2010

[via FeatureLight UK]
“In the run-up to Christmas 2010, more commercial Christmas trees could feature LED lighting as retailers look to lower the environmental impact of large-scale decorations.

Festive decorations designer Christmas Lights, Etc says that the power consumption of a normal 23-foot tree reaches 8,160 Watts.

With LED lighting, this drops to 1,566 Watts, making the technology a way to demonstrate festive spirit and environmental awareness in the run-up to Christmas.” 


The article above is worth a read.  Everyone is becoming “green” minded.  It’s true.  For example, the 2010 Christmas season will feature an unprecedented offering of LED lights as dreams of a White Christmas settle for the reality of a Green one. 

The picture above from Inhabitat is of the Rockefeller Center’s famous tree decked out in LED lights.  This photo is from 2007 and the LED adornments were a first for the famous Fir.  A LED Christmas tree in 2007 was cutting edge but we still haven’t progressed much in our thinking.  An LED Christmas tree is still thought of as cutting edge and futuristic, so the adoption has really been slow-going for mainstream America.  However, there are some companies that are leading the charge.  Home Depot isn’t dragging their feet.  They are offering a Trade In Program to ease customers into using LEDs.

In a similar effort, but not Christmas related, Lowes is offering to recycle your CFLs.  Lowes has been critizied in the past for not celebrating Christmas, so it’s no shock that their program doesn’t involve a Christmas theme.  Check out the video below for more details on Lowes’ recycling program.


http://www.wpri.com/video/videoplayer.swf?dppversion=5718

Join in the seasonal fun of the Holidays but this year consider giving the gift of conservation and good stewardship.  This planet has to last us awhile.  Check out the links below for LED Christmas lights.

Want more?

 

What Does An LED Bulb Have To Do With Jets?

November 3, 2010
This bulb is a monster.  The story below has been catching some buzz over the past few weeks so I wanted to make sure you were aware of it.  This bulb won’t be in your home anytime soon (you’re probably sighing with relief), but the technology will.  So, what does an LED bulb have to do with jets?  Engineers at GE have designed a bulb that will emit,
1,500 lumens of light — equal to a 100-watt halogen spotlight — but uses only a third of the energy! 
GE Engineers reached this benchmark by designing a better heat management system.  LEDs are suseptible to heat and are damaged at relatively low temperatures.  GE design a system of bellows and cavities that direct air, naturally, from a high to low area of pressure, much like the design of a jet engine. 

GE, jet engine led bulb, jet engine cooled lighting, energy-efficient lighting, LED bulb, University of Maryland, general electric, 100-watt halogen spotlight, green lighting, eco lighting

Heat synchs will be used more effectively using GE’s design.  The result is a bulb that can operate at a higher current, which creates more lumens, without getting too hot, without damage occurring or a decrease in efficientcy.

The full story can be found, here, on Inhabitat’s site.


OLED Video Eye Candy

November 2, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/MqIvJN_X8qI?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00

 

Did you enjoy the video? I hope you did, but if you can read what I’m typing it probably means you are in a country that won’t see this technology for some time. If, on the the other hand, you are looking at this post thinking, “Man, those faces look familiar, but I can’t read a lick of what this guy has written,” then you are probably in a country that runs with OLED milk and honey. Or, put bluntly, you’re in an Asian market.

The Asian markets are hotbeds of LED and OLED product research and manufacture.  Watching videos, like the one above, is like taking a time machine into the future for those of us here in the States.  It gives us a glimse of what will be landing on our shores in the next 5-10 years.

Similar technology has been showcased in the lighting industries as well.  OLED and LED light is trully the light of the future.